Difference between revisions of "Vinegar Hill"

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'''Vinegar Hill''' was a historically black neighborhood that was razed in 1964 as part of a Charlottesville-led redevelopment program.  
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'''Vinegar Hill''' was a historically black neighborhood that was razed in 1962 as part of a Charlottesville-led redevelopment program. <ref>{{cite web|title=Vinegar Hill Monument Proposal|url=http://www.charlottesville.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=20564|author=|work=|publisher=Dialogue on Race|location=Page 13|publishdate=|accessdate=November 21, 2011}}</ref>
  
 
In 1960, Charlottesville voters approved a referendum authorizing the redevelopment of Vinegar Hill. The area was leveled in 1964. Many of the approximately 500 displaced residents moved into the [[Westhaven]] public housing project. <ref name=apology/>
 
In 1960, Charlottesville voters approved a referendum authorizing the redevelopment of Vinegar Hill. The area was leveled in 1964. Many of the approximately 500 displaced residents moved into the [[Westhaven]] public housing project. <ref name=apology/>

Revision as of 15:30, 21 November 2011


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Vinegar Hill was a historically black neighborhood that was razed in 1962 as part of a Charlottesville-led redevelopment program. [1]

In 1960, Charlottesville voters approved a referendum authorizing the redevelopment of Vinegar Hill. The area was leveled in 1964. Many of the approximately 500 displaced residents moved into the Westhaven public housing project. [2]

Legacy

Since the redevelopment was completed, it has been a point of contention in local race relations. On November 7, 2011, City Council approved a resolution apologizing for the redevelopment. [2] A group is seeking to build a monument to the neighborhood on the grounds of the Jefferson School City Center and is asking City Council[when?] for $24,000 from the Percent for Art fund to pay for its design. [3]


References

  1. Web. Vinegar Hill Monument Proposal, Dialogue on Race, Page 13, retrieved November 21, 2011.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Web. Charlottesville officially apologizes for razing Vinegar Hill, Graham Moomaw, Daily Progress, World Media Enterprises, November 07, 2011
  3. Web. November 21, 2011 City Council Agenda, City of Charlottesville, Page 12, retrieved November 21, 2011.

External Links