Difference between revisions of "Thomas S. Martin"

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'''Thomas Staples Martin''' (1847-1919) was a Scottsville lawyer who served 26 years in the United States Senate before his death. <ref>{{cite-progress-lindsay|title=Virginias Not in the Habit of Defeating Senator|=http://search.lib.virginia.edu/catalog/uva-lib:2122577/view#openLayer/uva-lib:2122579/6142.5/3086.5/3/1/0|author=Staff Reports|pageno=2|printdate=August 8, 1922|publishdate=August 8, 1922|accessdate=August 7, 2016 from University of Virginia Library}}</ref> <ref>{{cite web|title=
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'''Thomas Staples Martin''' (July 29, [[1847]] – November 12, [[1919]]) was a Scottsville lawyer who served 26 years (from 1895 until 1919) in the United States Senate before his death while in office, at his home in Charlottesville. <ref>{{cite-progress-lindsay|title=Virginias Not in the Habit of Defeating Senator|=http://search.lib.virginia.edu/catalog/uva-lib:2122577/view#openLayer/uva-lib:2122579/6142.5/3086.5/3/1/0|author=Staff Reports|pageno=2|printdate=August 8, 1922|publishdate=August 8, 1922|accessdate=August 7, 2016 from University of Virginia Library}}</ref> Martin was most notable as a railroad attorney and an architect of the state Democratic Party machine that during his time was known as the [[Martin Organization]], (later becoming known as the Byrd Organization).<ref>{{cite web|title=
 
Thomas Staples Martin: Senator, Leader, Virginian|url=http://scottsvillemuseum.com/portraits/homeTSM004.html|author=|work=|publisher=Scottsville Museum|location=|publishdate=|accessdate=August 7, 2016}}</ref>
 
Thomas Staples Martin: Senator, Leader, Virginian|url=http://scottsvillemuseum.com/portraits/homeTSM004.html|author=|work=|publisher=Scottsville Museum|location=|publishdate=|accessdate=August 7, 2016}}</ref>
  
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Until about 1909, he lived in the village of his birth, Scottsville, when he purchased a home near the University he would renovate and name "Montesano" (eventually to be know as the [[Faulkner House]])<ref>https://www.dhr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/002-0146-Faulkner-House-1984-Final-Nomination.pdf</ref>. An American lawyer and Democratic Party politician from [[Scottsville]], Martin founded a political organization that held power in Virginia for decades (later becoming known as the [[Byrd Organization]]). Martin's home, [[Faulkner House]], was added to the National Register of Historic Places in [[1984]].
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{{Wikipedia link|Thomas_S._Martin|whylink=wellcovered|linktext=Thomas S. Martin}}
  
 
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Latest revision as of 22:40, 18 April 2020

Thomas Staples Martin (July 29, 1847 – November 12, 1919) was a Scottsville lawyer who served 26 years (from 1895 until 1919) in the United States Senate before his death while in office, at his home in Charlottesville. [1] Martin was most notable as a railroad attorney and an architect of the state Democratic Party machine that during his time was known as the Martin Organization, (later becoming known as the Byrd Organization).[2]

Until about 1909, he lived in the village of his birth, Scottsville, when he purchased a home near the University he would renovate and name "Montesano" (eventually to be know as the Faulkner House)[3]. An American lawyer and Democratic Party politician from Scottsville, Martin founded a political organization that held power in Virginia for decades (later becoming known as the Byrd Organization). Martin's home, Faulkner House, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.


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References

  1. Print: Virginias Not in the Habit of Defeating Senator, Staff Reports, Daily Progress, Lindsay family August 8, 1922, Page 2.
  2. Web. Thomas Staples Martin: Senator, Leader, Virginian, Scottsville Museum, retrieved August 7, 2016.
  3. https://www.dhr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/002-0146-Faulkner-House-1984-Final-Nomination.pdf

External Links