Difference between revisions of "Monticello Wine Company"

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Founded in 1873, the '''Monticello Wine Company''' was considered the largest winery in the South. <ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/hiway_markers/marker.cfm?mid=4472 |title=Historical Highway Markers: Monticello Wine Company |publisher=Virginia Department of Historic Resources |date=2008-11-30}}</ref> The company shut down with the onset of Prohibition. Virginia went dry at the stroke of midnight on [[November 1]], [[1916]]. The whole country followed on [[January 16]], [[1920]].<ref>{{cite web|title=Virginia's Prohibition history|url=https://pilotonline.com/news/local/article_20b31552-ad56-5547-aacb-f3524f731ae1.html|author=Lorraine Eaton|work=|publisher=The Virginian-Pilot|location=150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA|publishdate=November 30, 2008|accessdate=March 20, 2019}}</ref>
 
Founded in 1873, the '''Monticello Wine Company''' was considered the largest winery in the South. <ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/hiway_markers/marker.cfm?mid=4472 |title=Historical Highway Markers: Monticello Wine Company |publisher=Virginia Department of Historic Resources |date=2008-11-30}}</ref> The company shut down with the onset of Prohibition. Virginia went dry at the stroke of midnight on [[November 1]], [[1916]]. The whole country followed on [[January 16]], [[1920]].<ref>{{cite web|title=Virginia's Prohibition history|url=https://pilotonline.com/news/local/article_20b31552-ad56-5547-aacb-f3524f731ae1.html|author=Lorraine Eaton|work=|publisher=The Virginian-Pilot|location=150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA|publishdate=November 30, 2008|accessdate=March 20, 2019}}</ref>
  
The [[Monticello Wine Company House]], one of Charlottesville's individually protected properties, is located at [[212 Wine Street]].<ref>"Charlottesville : Architectural Design Control District and Individually Protected Property Information." Charlottesville : Home. Web. 16 Aug. 2010. <http://www.charlottesville.org/Index.aspx?page=812>.</ref>.
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Capt. [[Adolph Russow]] (April 9, 1851 – October 8, 1923) had been in charge of the business from [[1873]] to [[1916]], and its general manager and superintendent.  Russow lived in a company house at what is now [[212 Wine Street]].  The Monticello Wine Company gave him the house after selling off its stock and closing its doors in [[1916]], a “victim” of state-adopted prohibition.
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::The [[Monticello Wine Company House]] is one of Charlottesville's individually protected properties.<ref>"Charlottesville : Architectural Design Control District and Individually Protected Property Information." Charlottesville : Home. Web. 16 Aug. 2010. <http://www.charlottesville.org/Index.aspx?page=812>.</ref>.
  
 
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Latest revision as of 21:48, 16 December 2020

1896 insurance map of Monticello Wine Co's Cellar

Founded in 1873, the Monticello Wine Company was considered the largest winery in the South. [1] The company shut down with the onset of Prohibition. Virginia went dry at the stroke of midnight on November 1, 1916. The whole country followed on January 16, 1920.[2]

Capt. Adolph Russow (April 9, 1851 – October 8, 1923) had been in charge of the business from 1873 to 1916, and its general manager and superintendent. Russow lived in a company house at what is now 212 Wine Street. The Monticello Wine Company gave him the house after selling off its stock and closing its doors in 1916, a “victim” of state-adopted prohibition.

The Monticello Wine Company House is one of Charlottesville's individually protected properties.[3].


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References

  1. Web. Historical Highway Markers: Monticello Wine Company, Virginia Department of Historic Resources
  2. Web. Virginia's Prohibition history, Lorraine Eaton, The Virginian-Pilot, 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA, November 30, 2008, retrieved March 20, 2019.
  3. "Charlottesville : Architectural Design Control District and Individually Protected Property Information." Charlottesville : Home. Web. 16 Aug. 2010. <http://www.charlottesville.org/Index.aspx?page=812>.

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