Difference between revisions of "List of Charlottesville zoning districts"

From Cvillepedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Removed stub category.)
m (added breakdown from city notes)
Line 1: Line 1:
[[Charlottesville]]'s zoning is organized by the following districts, each with its own permitted uses.  
+
[[Charlottesville]]'s zoning is organized by districts, each with its own permitted uses. There are other types of zoning, the one most frequently brought up is a [[Form-Based Code]]. In general the focus of the form-based code in on the forms buildings take, rather than their use.
 +
 
 +
[[Charlottesville]]'s zoning is organized by the following districts:
 +
 
 +
Within a category of zoning, such as Residential, there are various levels of intensity, or restrictiveness. R-1, the least intense and most restrictive, to R-3, the most intense and least restrictive. In general, the higher numbers are more intense and less restrictive than lower numbers. The first letter(s) of a zoning designation describes what general type it is (example: R, B or M) in Charlottesville’s Zoning Code, followed by a number; the higher the number, generally the more intense the land use.  
  
 
==Residential==
 
==Residential==
* R-1
+
Residential zones are classified in the following categories (§34-350)
* R-1U
+
*Single-family (R-1): low-density areas where the dominate pattern of residential development is the single-family dwelling.
* R-1S
+
:*R-1; low-density residential areas
* R-1SU
+
:*R-1S; low-density residential areas characterized by smaller lots
* R-2
+
:*R-1U; low-density residential areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia
* R-2U
+
:*R-1SU; low-density residential areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia characterized by smaller lots
* R-3
+
 
* University Medium Density
+
*Two-family (R-2): low-density areas where additional housing opportunities are available beyond the single-family dwelling
* University High Density
+
:*R-2; low-density residential areas in which single-family attached and two-family dwellings are encouraged
 +
:*R-2U; low density residential areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia in which single-family attached and two-family dwellings are encouraged
 +
 
 +
*Multifamily: areas for medium-density and high-density residential development, with the high density permitted only when harmonious with surrounding areas
 +
:*R-3; medium-density residential areas in which medium-density developments, including multifamily uses, are encouraged
 +
:*R-UMD; (University Medium Density) areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia in which medium-density developments, including multifamily uses, are encouraged
 +
:*R-UHD; (University High Density) areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia in which high-density residential developments, including multifamily uses, are encouraged
 +
Generally speaking, the older residential neighborhoods such as Fifeville, North Downtown, Woolen Mills and Rose Hill are predominantly R-1S, with smaller properties characterizing a pre-World War II development pattern. “Newer” residential neighborhoods, like Greenbrier, Meadowbrook Heights and The Meadows that developed after World War II are predominantly R-1.
 +
 
 +
Pockets of two-family zoning can be seen in the Fry’s Spring, Martha Jefferson, Starr Hill, Fifeville and Belmont neighborhoods. Neighborhoods like Lewis Mountain and Venable contain most of the city’s R-1U zoning, and the Jefferson Park Avenue neighborhood has the majority of the city’s R-2U zoning.
 +
 
 +
The medium-density R-3 property is minimal, mostly confined to the northern tip of Park Street and to sites owned by the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. The “university” multifamily zones (R-UMD and R-UHD) are seen exclusively in the Jefferson Park Avenue and Venable neighborhoods.<ref> https://www.charlottesville.org/home/showdocument?id=16311</ref>
 +
 
 
* McIntire-5th Residential
 
* McIntire-5th Residential
 
* [[Planned Unit Development]]
 
* [[Planned Unit Development]]

Revision as of 22:28, 15 July 2019

Charlottesville's zoning is organized by districts, each with its own permitted uses. There are other types of zoning, the one most frequently brought up is a Form-Based Code. In general the focus of the form-based code in on the forms buildings take, rather than their use.

Charlottesville's zoning is organized by the following districts:

Within a category of zoning, such as Residential, there are various levels of intensity, or restrictiveness. R-1, the least intense and most restrictive, to R-3, the most intense and least restrictive. In general, the higher numbers are more intense and less restrictive than lower numbers. The first letter(s) of a zoning designation describes what general type it is (example: R, B or M) in Charlottesville’s Zoning Code, followed by a number; the higher the number, generally the more intense the land use.

Residential

Residential zones are classified in the following categories (§34-350)

  • Single-family (R-1): low-density areas where the dominate pattern of residential development is the single-family dwelling.
  • R-1; low-density residential areas
  • R-1S; low-density residential areas characterized by smaller lots
  • R-1U; low-density residential areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia
  • R-1SU; low-density residential areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia characterized by smaller lots
  • Two-family (R-2): low-density areas where additional housing opportunities are available beyond the single-family dwelling
  • R-2; low-density residential areas in which single-family attached and two-family dwellings are encouraged
  • R-2U; low density residential areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia in which single-family attached and two-family dwellings are encouraged
  • Multifamily: areas for medium-density and high-density residential development, with the high density permitted only when harmonious with surrounding areas
  • R-3; medium-density residential areas in which medium-density developments, including multifamily uses, are encouraged
  • R-UMD; (University Medium Density) areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia in which medium-density developments, including multifamily uses, are encouraged
  • R-UHD; (University High Density) areas in the vicinity of the University of Virginia in which high-density residential developments, including multifamily uses, are encouraged

Generally speaking, the older residential neighborhoods such as Fifeville, North Downtown, Woolen Mills and Rose Hill are predominantly R-1S, with smaller properties characterizing a pre-World War II development pattern. “Newer” residential neighborhoods, like Greenbrier, Meadowbrook Heights and The Meadows that developed after World War II are predominantly R-1.

Pockets of two-family zoning can be seen in the Fry’s Spring, Martha Jefferson, Starr Hill, Fifeville and Belmont neighborhoods. Neighborhoods like Lewis Mountain and Venable contain most of the city’s R-1U zoning, and the Jefferson Park Avenue neighborhood has the majority of the city’s R-2U zoning.

The medium-density R-3 property is minimal, mostly confined to the northern tip of Park Street and to sites owned by the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. The “university” multifamily zones (R-UMD and R-UHD) are seen exclusively in the Jefferson Park Avenue and Venable neighborhoods.[1]

Commercial

  • B-1
  • B-3
  • B-2
  • Emmet Street Commercial

Industrial

  • M-I
  • Industrial Corridor

Mixed-use

  • Downtown Corridor
  • Downtown Extended Corridor
  • Downtown North Corridor
  • West Main North Corridor
  • West Main South Corridor
  • Central City Corridor
  • Urban Corridor
  • High Street Corridor
  • Highway Corridor
  • Neighborhood Commercial Corridor
  • Cherry Avenue Corridor
  • South Street District Corridor
  • The Corner District Corridor
  • Water Street District Corridor

Overlay districts

These districts are in addition to the above.

References

  • https://www.charlottesville.org/home/showdocument?id=16311