Difference between revisions of "Lee Park"

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'''Lee Park''' is a [[Charlottesville Department of Parks and Recreation|Charlottesville City Park]], centrally located in downtown Charlottesville, and home to many festivals.  
 
'''Lee Park''' is a [[Charlottesville Department of Parks and Recreation|Charlottesville City Park]], centrally located in downtown Charlottesville, and home to many festivals.  
 
  
 
The city's [[Charlottesville Comprehensive Plan|comprehensive plan]] classifies Lee Park as an 'urban' park<ref name="compplan10">{{cite web|title=Charlottesville Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 10|url=http://www.charlottesville.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=8182|author=|work=|publisher=City of Charlottesville|location=Charlottesville, Virginia|publishdate=|accessdate=October 19, 2010}}</ref>. The park is often used for festivals and music performances. The western side of the park is used as seating space for the [[Garage]].  
 
The city's [[Charlottesville Comprehensive Plan|comprehensive plan]] classifies Lee Park as an 'urban' park<ref name="compplan10">{{cite web|title=Charlottesville Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 10|url=http://www.charlottesville.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=8182|author=|work=|publisher=City of Charlottesville|location=Charlottesville, Virginia|publishdate=|accessdate=October 19, 2010}}</ref>. The park is often used for festivals and music performances. The western side of the park is used as seating space for the [[Garage]].  

Revision as of 08:48, 28 March 2012

Lee Park is a Charlottesville City Park, centrally located in downtown Charlottesville, and home to many festivals.

The city's comprehensive plan classifies Lee Park as an 'urban' park[1]. The park is often used for festivals and music performances. The western side of the park is used as seating space for the Garage.

History

The park was established in 1918 on land donated to the city by Paul Goodloe McIntire. [2] McIntire also donated the statue of Robert E. Lee that is the centerpiece of the park. It was unveiled on May 21, 1924 during a Confederate reunion.

Occupy Charlottesville

The group Occupy Charlottesville began a protest campaign in mid-October 2011 which involved setting up tents to establish a permanent presence in the park. The city granted a series of permits allowing the occupation to continue and the current permit expires on November 24, 2011. [3]The ongoing occupation prompted questions from Jefferson Area Tea Party chair Carole Thorpe regarding whether the city showed favoritism by granting the group a permit. [4] The city evicted protestors on November 30, 2011 and 18 people were arrested. [5]

Local Voices, Local History

VIDEO CREDITS: Narrated by Preston Coiner;
Graphic design: Jen Fleischer; Project Manager: Kristin Rourke.

References

  1. Web. Charlottesville Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 10, City of Charlottesville, Charlottesville, Virginia, retrieved October 19, 2010.
  2. Web. Lee Park, audiotourcville, audiotourcville, July 25, 2011, retrieved August 19, 2011.
  3. Web. Occupiers face balancing act with some who've joined in, Graham Moomaw, Daily Progress, World Media Enterprises, November 5, 2011, retrieved November 7, 2011.
  4. Web. Jefferson Area Tea Party chair suspicious of Councilor Brown comment, Brendan Fitzgerald, C-VILLE Weekly, Portico Publications, October 18, 2011, retrieved November 7, 2011.
  5. Web. Officials hear 'death knell' of Occupy Charlottesville, Graham Moomaw, Daily Progress, World Media Enterprises, December 1, 2011, retrieved December 5, 2011.

External links