Sandbox-homelessness

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January 24, 2018 Point-in-Time (PIT) Count

CoCs Continuum of Care (CoC) Sheltered - Emergency Shelter Sheltered - Transitional Housing Unsheltered Total # Homeless As a % of Total # Virginia Homeless CoC Population: (based on 2017 Cooper Center Estimate) Homeless as a % of the total CoCs population
VA Virginia Total of State 4232 828 915 5975 100% 8,517,685 0.07%
VA-500 Richmond/Henrico, Chesterfiled, Hanover Counties 406 99 104 609 10% 993,643 0.06%
VA-501 Norfolk/Chesapeake, Suffolk, Isle of Wright, Southampton Counties 597 96 80 773 13% 976,916 0.08%
VA-502 Roanoke City, Roanoke County, Salem City 306 0 11 317 5% 219,322 0.14%
VA-503 Virginia Beach 162 9 72 243 4% 454,448 0.05%
VA-504 Charlottesville 134 21 28 183 3% 49,132 0.37%
VA-505 Newport News City, Hampton/Virginia Penninsula 293 76 70 439 7% 519,085 0.08%
VA-507 Portsmouth 81 26 28 135 2% 95,440 0.14%
VA-508 Lynchburg 92 0 20 112 2% 80,380 0.14%
VA-513 Harrisonburg, Winchester/Western Virginia 260 16 28 304 5% 54,689 0.56%
VA-514 Fredericksburg/Spotsylvania, Stafford Counties 164 0 36 200 3% 390,713 0.05%
VA-600 Arlington County 173 13 35 221 4% 239,074 0.09%
VA-601 Fairfax County 686 215 86 987 17% 1,143,429 0.09%
VA-602 Loudoun County 96 14 24 134 2% 396,068 0.03%
VA-603 Alexandria County 164 47 15 226 4% 160,719 0.14%
VA-604 Prince William County 176 85 113 374 6% 455,990 0.08%
VA-521 Virginia Balance of State 442 111 165 718 12% 2,288,637 0.03%

Background Notes

2019 PIT Count Poster Date Published: October 2018

Data Sources

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Historical and Contextual Influences on the U.S. Response to Contemporary Homelessness

PIT Methodology etc.

The Point-in-Time (PIT) count is a count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons on a single night in January. HUD requires that Continuums of Care (CoCs) conduct an annual count of homeless persons who are sheltered in emergency shelter, transitional housing, and Safe Havens on a single night. CoCs also must conduct a count of unsheltered homeless persons every other year (odd numbered years). Each count is planned, coordinated, and carried out locally. The Housing Inventory Count (HIC) is a point-in-time inventory of provider programs within a CoC that provide beds and units dedicated to serve persons who are homeless, categorized by five Program Types:[4]

  1. Emergency Shelter;
  2. Transitional Housing;
  3. Rapid Re-housing;
  4. Safe Haven;
  5. Permanent Supportive Housing.

Permanent Supportive Housing

The Housing Inventory Count (HIC) is a point-in-time inventory of provider programs within a CoC that provide beds and units dedicated to serve persons who are homeless, categorized by five Program Types: Emergency Shelter; Transitional Housing; Rapid Re-housing; Safe Haven; and Permanent Supportive Housing.[5]

The Charlottesville region had 250 individuals experiencing homelessness in 2012 according to The Haven (formerly the Thomas Jefferson Area Coalition for the Homeless), which conducts the annual Point-in-Time count.Charlottesville, Virginia Embraces Housing First to Tackle Regional Homelessness U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD Source of Data Numbers: facilities, housing numbers for each

  • Facilities & Number Count
  • Brick and mortar and soft costs (per bed?)
  1. The Crossings. Straight from website: The Crossings represents the Charlottesville area’s first permanent supportive housing community for formerly homeless individuals. It’s also a mixed-income community in which 30 of the 60 studio apartments are designated for individuals who may not have experienced homelessness but whose incomes are 50 percent or less of the area median income.[6]

What is the official definition of homelessness?

There is more than one “official” definition of homelessness. Different agencies use different definitions of homelessness, which affect how various programs determine eligibility for individuals and families at the state and local level. Health centers use the HHS definition in providing services.[7]

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

Programs funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) use a more limited definition of homelessness [found in the Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act of 2009 (P.L. 111-22, Section 1003)].

  1. An individual who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence;
  2. An individual who has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings, including a car, park, abandoned building, bus or train station, airport, or camping ground;
  3. An individual or family living in a supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including hotels and motels paid for by Federal, State or local government programs for low-income individuals or by charitable organizations, congregate shelters, and transitional housing);
  4. An individual who resided in a shelter or place not meant for human habitation and who is exiting an institution where he or she temporarily resided;
  5. An individual or family who will imminently lose their housing [as evidenced by a court order resulting from an eviction action that notifies the individual or family that they must leave within 14 days, having a primary nighttime residence that is a room in a hotel or motel and where they lack the resources necessary to reside there for more than 14 days, or credible evidence indicating that the owner or renter of the housing will not allow the individual or family to stay for more than 14 days, and any oral statement from an individual or family seeking homeless assistance that is found to be credible shall be considered credible evidence for purposes of this clause]; has no subsequent residence identified; and lacks the resources or support networks needed to obtain other permanent housing; and
  6. Unaccompanied youth and homeless families with children and youth defined as homeless under other Federal statutes who have experienced a long-term period without living independently in permanent housing, have experienced persistent instability as measured by frequent moves over such period, and can be expected to continue in such status for an extended period of time because of chronic disabilities, chronic physical health or mental health conditions, substance addiction, histories of domestic violence or childhood abuse, the presence of a child or youth with a disability, or multiple barriers to employment.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

Health centers funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) use a different, broader definition of homelessness:

  • A homeless individual is defined as “an individual who lacks housing (without regard to whether the individual is a member of a family), including an individual whose primary residence during the night is a supervised public or private facility (e.g., shelters) that provides temporary living accommodations, and an individual who is a resident in transitional housing.” A homeless person is an individual without permanent housing who may live on the streets; stay in a shelter, mission, single room occupancy facilities, abandoned building or vehicle; or in any other unstable or non-permanent situation. [Section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C., 254b)]
An individual may be considered to be homeless if that person is “doubled up,” a term that refers to a situation where individuals are unable to maintain their housing situation and are forced to stay with a series of friends and/or extended family members. In addition, previously homeless individuals who are to be released from a prison or a hospital may be considered homeless if they do not have a stable housing situation to which they can return. A recognition of the instability of an individual’s living arrangements is critical to the definition of homelessness. (HRSA/Bureau of Primary Health Care, Program Assistance Letter 99-12, Health Care for the Homeless Principles of Practice)

330(h) Homeless Population

  • For the purposes of health centers receiving a Health Center Program award or designation under section 330(h) of the Public Health Service Act, the population served includes individuals:
  1. Who lack housing (without regard to whether the individual is a member of a family);
  2. Whose primary residence during the night is a supervised public or private facility that provides temporary living accommodations;
  3. Who reside in transitional housing; and/or
  4. Who reside in permanent supportive housing or other housing programs that are targeted to homeless populations.
  • Under section 330(h) a health center may continue to provide services for up to 12 months to formerly homeless individuals whom the health center has previously served but are no longer homeless as a result of becoming a resident in permanent housing and may also serve children and youth at risk of homelessness, homeless veterans, and veterans at risk of homelessness. (Section 330(h) of the PHS Act)[8]

Point-in-Time (PIT) Count

The Point-in-Time (PIT) Count, an annual effort led by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), is a count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons on a single night in January. The Point-in-Time Count, as a one-night survey of the homeless population, does not represent a definitive census of the homeless. Instead, it offers a general snapshot of what is happening in the community.[9] HUD requires that Continuums of Care (CoCs) conduct an annual count of homeless persons who are sheltered in emergency shelter, transitional housing, and Safe Havens on a single night. to estimate the number of homeless Americans, without safe, stable housing nationwide to help direct resources based on need.

What the PIT Count Measures

The PIT Count is among the ways estimates the homeless population nationwide to help direct resources based on need.

The PIT Count and what it measures

The most recent PIT Count was conducted in January 2019.

  • The PIT Count is administered by HUD’s more than 400 Continuums of Care (CoCs), which are local planning bodies responsible for coordinating all homelessness services in a geographic area.
  • During even-numbered years, CoCs are only required to count sheltered persons (those living in emergency shelters and transitional housing), although many CoCs voluntarily collect data about unsheltered persons during those years.
  • During odd-numbered years, CoCs are required to count sheltered and unsheltered persons—those living on the street or in another place not meant for human habitation.
  • The January 2019 PIT Count results reflect national snapshots of homelessness through the end of 2018.[10]

History of homelessness

While there have been temporary lulls, from colonial times forward there has been no period of American history free of homelessness. Writers such as Caton and Kusmer suggest there have been at least five waves of homelessness, including contemporary homelessness, that reached levels causing social concern. The periods for these consequential episodes of homelessness and selected similarities and differences across them are summarized.[11]

Statutes at Large of Virginia (1792-1806) Chapter 40 – An ACT providing for the poor, and declaring who shall be deemed vagrant, passed December 26, 1792. 

Vagrancy Act of 1866 Overseer of the Poor


References

External Links