S. Dexter Forbes

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S. Dexter Forbes was a Charlottesville businessman who served one terms on the City Council in the 1950's. He was the owner of Forbes Garden Supply.

Biography

Forbes was born in Purcellsville in Loudon County and received a doctorate in veterinary medicine from George Washington University. He served as a lieutenant in the Army veterinary corps in World War I. He moved to Charlottesville in 1924 and was a wood supplier for the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company.

In January 1942, he was president of the Kiwanis Club. [1] In 1957 he opened Forbes Garden Supply on U.S. 29 north. He and his wife Anna had no children.

In February 1949 he became vice-president of an optimists group. [2]

His address in 1960 was 1603 Grady Avenue.

Forbes was elected to City Council in 1953 but did not seek a second term in 1957. [3]

1960 primary

Forbes sought to return to Council in 1960 and announced his candidacy as part of slate with M.A. Cohen and Carl B. Deane. [3]

Forbes was an opponent of the urban renewal of the city's black neighborhoods which resulted in the creation of public housing. [4]


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1960 election

Candidates Votes %
Bernard J. Haggerty (D) 2,898
Lindsey B. Mount (D) 2,718
Robert E. Lee (R) 2,167
S. Dexter Forbes (D) 2,122
Source: City of Charlottesville[5]

Each voter could vote for up to three candidates.

References

  1. Web. Return to 'Economic Democracy' After War Is Urged, Staff Reports, Daily Progress Digitized Microfilm, Lindsay family, February 3, 1942, retrieved February 3, 2017 from University of Virginia Library. Print. February 3, 1942 page 2.
  2. Web. Optimist Chapter Is Formed Here, Staff Reports, Daily Progress Digitized Microfilm, Lindsay family, February 9, 1949, retrieved February 9, 2017 from University of Virginia Library. Print. February 9, 1949 page 3.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Print: Three Enter Primary for City Council Posts, Staff reports, Daily Progress, Lindsay family January 4, 1960, Page A1.
  4. Web. Urban renewal and the end of black culture in Charlottesville, Virginia: an oral history of Vinegar Hil, Dorothy West, James Robert Saunders, Renae Nadine Shackelford, McFarland, 1998, retrieved December 29, 2010.
  5. Web. Election Results for June 14, 1960, City of Charlottesville, retrieved December 30, 2010.