Midway School Building

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Midway School Building, ca. 1906

Midway School Building, also known as Old Midway, was built on the site of a former Midway House hotel[1] and Civil War era hospital, the former high school building stood at the intersection of Ridge and West Main Streets.

Midway School is a defunct Charlottesville public school building once located on Ridge Street corner of Main Street.[2] now the site of Midway Manor Apartments.

Built in 1893 as the graded school for Charlottesville’s white students, this building was the first location of Charlottesville High School, later named Lane High School after Principal James Walker Lane). It was replaced in 1940 by a new Lane High School (now the Albemarle County Office Building) at the northwest corner of Preston Avenue and McIntire Road. Old Midway housed a number of city agencies, notably the Welfare and Health Department until 1966. It was also used as a city storage facility. The building was torn down in 1973. The city sold the property in 1980. Midway Manor Apartments at 100 Ridge Street occupies the site.

One of the first public schools in Charlottesville dates back to 1881. By 1889, public schools were managed by the Charlottesville City School Board.

The Charlottesville Education Association was organized March 9, 1906, at the Midway School building, the following officers being elected for the ensuing year: Hon. J. W. Fishburne, president. Mrs. C. H. Walker, first vice-president, Mrs. A. H. Tuttle, second vice-president, Dr. E. Reinhold Rogers, third vice-president, Mr. Bruce R. Payne, secretary, Captain Thomas P. Peyton, treasurer.[3]

In 1914, Midway Public School served primary, grammar and high schools; Principal, James W. Lane.

Charlottesville City Council held a special meeting on September 29, 1980 to convey the property deed to the Midway Manor Association. [4] The school building was later demolished. The property is now the location of Midway Manor Apartments.


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References

  1. Web. Historic and Architectural Properties, September 7, 1982, retrieved December 1, 2023.
  2. Web. Greenwood School Memories 1921-1984, Meeks Enterprises, 1984, retrieved February 15, 2022.
  3. Web. The Daily Progress Historical and Industrial Magazine Charlottesville Virginia "The Athens of the South", Progress Publishing Company Charlottesville, Va., 1906; reprint, Charlottesville: The Albemarle County Historical Society, 1993
  4. Web. Charlottesville City Council meeting minutes, .pdf, Council Chambers, City of Charlottesville, September 29, 1980.

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